The True Meaning of Memorial Day
  • Post last modified:May 25, 2018
  • Post category:Insurance

While you may be looking forward to a family barbeque or get together with friends, our agency likes to observe the true meaning of Memorial Day: honoring those who were fallen or lost at war. Many brave men and women have made the ultimate sacrifice to protect our beautiful country, and for that, we are forever grateful.

History of Memorial Day

Memorial Day was first observed on a widespread basis back in May of 1868. Yes, our brave men and women have been protecting this country and our rights since the 1800’s, and many of them didn’t have the opportunity to come back home to their families. The celebration of Memorial Day commemorates their sacrifices, starting with the Civil War, and this holiday was made official by General John A Logan back in 1868. Following this proclamation, graves of more than 20,000 Union and Confederate soldiers were decorated and honored by participants who wanted to commemorate their sacrifices.

In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday celebrated in the United States on the last Monday in May each year. In 1986, President Ronald Reagan gave a great speech to commemorate our troops who went missing at war as well. He said, “Today is the day we put aside to remember fallen heroes and to pray that no heroes will ever have to die for us again. It’s a day of thanks for the valor of others, a day to remember the splendor of America and those of her children who rest in this cemetery and others. It’s a day to be with the family and remember.

“I was thinking this morning that across the country children and their parents will be going to the town parade and the young ones will sit on the sidewalks and wave their flags as the band goes by. Later, maybe, they’ll have a cookout or a day at the beach. And that’s good, because today is a day to be with the family and to remember.”

Let us remember this day together.

Would you like to learn more about the true meaning of Memorial Day? Check out one of our previous blogs by clicking the link below.

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